Sake Cocktail Recipe- SPICY SAKE PINEAPPLE SANGRIA

Sangria is a great party drink because you can make it well in advance and it taste better the longer all the fruit and flavour combine and mature. This recipe is to make a full pitcher of sake sangria. 

Mix everything and leave it in the refrigerator add ice and soda when you serve it to taste. If you want to increase the spice, just muddle raw jalapeño with some pineapple juice and add it to each cup or the pitcher.

To make the jalapeño syrup:
3/4 cup water 
3/4 cup sugar
1 diced jalapeño

Combine all in a pot. Bring to a boil. Then let sit until cool. Run through a strainer to remove the jalapeño pieces and seeds. 

Sake Cocktail Recipe- Oni Negroni

The Oni in Japanese culture is a spirit, ogre, or demon with horns. We could not resist the name ‘Oni Negroni’ and had to find a way to show off the signature orange, fiery, colour of the negroni while still managing to make it light enough to taste the sake. We opted for Aperol and Lillet to replace Campari and Vermouth. Hopefully you find the result devilishly delicious.

Wine of the Week: Stratus Weather Report Viognier

Temperatures are rising and falling everyday but Viognier is a rich and complex white that can be equally enjoyed on a crisp evening and a pleasant patio. 

PAIR WITH:
Creamy Curries (Korma)
Chicken Salad w/ Apple and Raisins
Persian Cauliflower 
Lobster tail, or Crab Cakes. 

Viognier historically coming from the Northern Rhône Valley of France is a grape that produces medium acidity with a round palate of stone fruit and citrus. The palate echos on the nose with additions of white flowers, and in the case of Stratus a pronounced minerality.

Get yours for $26.00

Maple Syrup – Canada’s liquid gold

With the maple leaf taking centre stage on our flag, it’s no wonder that a love of maple syrup is as much a part of our Canadian identity as hockey, Tim Horton’s, and the moose. Our country takes pride in the sugary stuff, and for good reason – we supply over 80% of the world’s sweetness!

A natural substitute for processed sugar, and a delicious addition to many dishes and cocktails, maple products are a national treasure.

How it’s done
While there are many species of maple trees in Canada, only three kinds are used to make syrup. With the arrival of spring, stored starches turn into sugar which is carried up from the roots, mixing with groundwater to provide nutrients in the form of sap. Trees are then tapped, with the freezing and thawing of maple trees coaxing the sap to run freely.

On average, it takes about 40 litres of sap to produce 1 liter of syrup, with a mature tree providing only 30-70 litres of sap every season.

Countries like Korea prefer the sweet-water taste of sap, but Canada’s production of maple products relies on the long, laborious process of boiling. If you’ve ever visited a sugar shack, you may have seen giant boilers, powered by electricity or wood-burning stoves.

Many uses for maple
Maple sap can be used for a range of products, as it changes states drastically the more you boil it.

There are three grades of Canadian maple syrup, with each level containing less water (and more maple sugar) than the next. Grade 1 ranges from very light to amber and will find a great place on your table, while Grade 2 is best for cooking and Grade 3 is reserved for commercial purposes.

Continual boiling will produce a maple taffy, then a semi-solid butter, followed by a soft sugar and finally a hard, crystallized sugar. These different maple products can be found on their own or in baked goods, oils, glazes, candies, teas, salad dressings and more.

Sweet celebrations
While Quebec is the country’s largest producer of maple, Ontario has its fair share of maple producers – and festivities!

Sugar shacks invite guests to engage with the age-old process, sometimes swapping out their modern tubes and pumps for old-fashioned taps and spivots. Hearty dishes like pancakes and sausages are often served up in huge quantities, along with crowd-favourite desserts like taffy on snow. You’re likely to catch someone playing a tune or two…and they’ll probably be clad in an iconic red-and-black checked jacket.

The communities of Prince Edward County celebrate the season with themed events and specialties during their annual Maple in the County weekend. Maple farms host family-friendly activities for all ages, with hands-on harvesting, live entertainment, and test-testing galore. Work off the sugar rushes on snowshoeing trails and tractor rides, or making a furry friend at a local petting zoo or animal sanctuary.

If you’re looking for an adults-only experience, many local restaurants highlight maple in their gourmet dishes and cocktails during this season. Many of the regions most acclaimed wineries even offer maple-inspired snacks, tastings, and pairings.


At New World Wine Tours, we’re thrilled to celebrate the sweetness with our gourmet food and wine partners in The County – contact us about unique wine and food tours during this year’s Maple in the County Festival.
 

See you in the sugarbush!

SaveSave

Mead – the drink of myth, legend, and the ancients

If you’re a fan of Game of Thrones, you are probably familiar with the oath of a lord or lady promising their sworn swordsman ‘meat and mead at their table’. This makes mead seem as ubiquitous as water or bread; and although Game of Thrones is fantasy, mead in ancient times was in fact commonplace.

What is mead?

Read moreMead – the drink of myth, legend, and the ancients

5 Reasons You Should Be Buying More Niagara Wine

Niagara wines vary in price and in Quality, but just like another region there are some award-winning and truly impeccable wines being made by a slew of talented wine makers, both local, and from all over Europe who have come here to make something special out of a very special region with unique characteristics. 

I tell you these wines are special, so here are the top 5 reasons you should buy more Niagara wine.

Read more5 Reasons You Should Be Buying More Niagara Wine

X